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GameDesign

 

Thank you for your application. Game Design is an exciting course within Uxbridge College’s School of Creative Studies that prepares you to work within the games industry in a number of creative roles. If you have a passion for games and want to become an animator, concept artist, designer or 3D modeller, then this course is for you!

During your studies, you'll create concept art for characters, environments and objects, as well as write stories, dialogue and original game pitches. You’ll also produce storyboards and 2D animation in addition to using professional software tools to create 3D models and animation. There are even opportunities to develop and document an original game concept which is then developed as a fully-playable prototype using industry-standard game engine tools. Along the way, you’ll research and critically analyse existing games as well as discuss structures and emerging trends within a fast-paced and ever-evolving industry.

The course delivery team is composed of subject specialists who have worked within the industry and have a decade of animation and game design teaching experience. Through established links, they have arranged work placement opportunities and visiting speakers from London-based developers.

We have a professional expectation of our students, and part of this is being able to express creative ideas through writing and drawing which are held in equal importance on this course. In addition to an interview, we require all students to provide a sketchbook or portfolio of artwork as well as samples of written work. You will also need to complete a specific game design project which is detailed below. Any offer is conditional on the provision of these elements unless otherwise stated.

If you have any questions about the task, please feel free to email Josh Barton,  the Course Team Leader - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Yours sincerely

The UCSCS Game Design Team

 


UCSCS Game Design – The Throne of King Bloodmaw

GameDesign1

  • The best game stories are not told simply told through cutscenes and dialogue, but also through the environment that players explore. The visual design of objects or textures can tell us a
    lot about different characters and situations.
  • This small project gives you the opportunity to develop a concept for a specific object that will communicate specific ideas through its appearance alone; the throne of a long-dead tyrant king. It is up to you to determine what this will look like based upon the information below
  • Descended from an ancient race of lizard mages, King Bloodmaw ruled the Ghost Isles with an iron fist. From a mighty throne forged by his ancestors, he commanded great armies to raze the countryside and oppress all those who would stand in his way. His cruel reign lasted for 263 years until he was betrayed by his closest ally at the battle of Bonesong Pike. 

Step One - Research Step Two - Development

Use the internet to gather photographic images that will help you to design the throne. Think about all of the things that could influence its appearance and how the king’s personality will be communicated to players. Shape, colour, texture and size could all be investigated.

  • You should save all of the images you have found with clear filenames in a labelled folder ready for submission.

Using the research that has been gathered, produce a series of sketchbook pages that show development of a concept for the throne. This is a good opportunity to experiment with different ideas for the seat, back, armrests and other elements. Silhouettes can also help to establish your idea’s ‘feel’.

  • You must scan in your sketchbook pages and save each as a .jpg image with clear filenames in a labelled folder ready for submission.
Step Three - Production Step Four - Justification

Once you have completed Step One and Step Two, produce a sketch of the final throne design from the front, side and top views as well as a three-quarter perspective. You can include or indicate colour if you like.

  • You must scan in your sketchbook pages and save each as a .jpg image with clear filenames in a labelled folder ready for submission.

Write a 500 word report which explains how you approached the research and design of the throne, and justifies the design decisions that were made in relation to the brief.

  • You must produce this document using Word, Pages or Google Docs with a clear filename ready for submission.

UCSCS Game Design – Further Information

During your interview, the tutor will arrange a date for a second interview where the project work will be reviewed. Please make sure that the project has been completed by this date, as failure toGameDesign2 do so will impact upon course offers. Please also make sure that the tutor can easily access the work during this interview, either online or alternative storage media.

Below, you can find some tips for approaching the project: 

  • Use lots of different sources to find research rather than relying on one particular website. Additionally, don’t use images from other games as part of your research. Going out and taking your own photographs can be an excellent way of gathering images.
  • Use a soft pencil (such as a 2B or 4B), especially when developing initial ideas as this will allow you to take a more relaxed and expressive approach to sketching. You can always use a harder pencil (such as an HB) to work in finer detail later on.
  • Draw big! Use the entire page to capture your ideas and work in finer detail where necessary. Alternatively, use a page to show iteration of a very specific part of the throne; how many different takes on the seat can you come up with that fit the brief?
  • If you feel that you need some more confidence in your drawing ability, use the excellent library of video tutorials available on Ctrl+Paint (http://www.ctrlpaint.com/library/) to pick up tips and techniques.

If you have any questions about the task, please feel free to email Josh Barton,  the Course Team Leader  - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Uxbridge College School of Creative Studies
Level 3 Creative Media Production

Thank you for your application - the Level 3 Creative Media Production is an exciting course within Uxbridge College’s School of Creative Studies. The course has a dual focus: enabling you to be ready for both university and to work in industry. If you have a passion for film and television, and want to gain a better understanding of digital video production, this is the course for you!

During your studies, you'll create digital video productions on various topics including: short films, music videos, advertisements, and documentaries. You’ll study the theoretical aspects of these topics (and more) to give you an understanding of the subject, and influence your decisions during the creative process.

You will also follow a three-step process: pre-production, production, and post production to create your digital video productions. A prior understanding of creative media production is not needed for this course, what is most important is you have a passion and enthusiasm for television and film.

The course delivery team is composed of subject specialists who have worked within the industry, have a wealth of theoretical knowledge, teaching experience, and most importantly are passionate about their subject. They are also dedicated to helping you succeed whether you decide to go onto university or straight into industry. The creative media production team look forward to working with you to produce great digital video productions.

We have a professional expectation of our students, and part of this is being able to express creative ideas through writing, working with cameras and editing software. In addition to an interview, we require all students to provide samples of written work and/or previous practical work. You will also need to complete a subject specific task which is detailed below. Any offer is conditional on the provision of these elements, unless otherwise stated.

If you have any questions about the task, please feel free to email one of the tutors on the Level 3 Creative Media Production course:

David Lashbrook (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
George Baldwin (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Tamara Lesniewska (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Yours sincerely

The UCSCS Creative Media Production Team


UCSCS Level 3 Creative Media Production – Film or Television Pitch

CreativeMedia

  • The best films and television programmes do not happen by chance. Every aspect of what you see on screen is the result of a long process of planning that enables interesting and dynamic stories to be told through a visual medium
  • This subject specific task gives you the opportunity to develop a concept for a film or television show that will communicate specific ideas through research and development. It is up to you to determine what type of film or television
  • There are no rules as to what idea you come up with as long as you can justify your creative decisions through research and development. If budget was no issue, what film or television show would you produce? how you would like to create.

 

 

Step One - Secondary Research Step Two - Initial Idea

Think about films and/or television shows that you enjoy watching. Try to consider what you like and dislike about them. This will help to influence your own idea later on. Decide whether you want to focus on film or television. Once you have made a decision:

  • Pick two of your favourite films or television shows and write a 300-400 word review outlining what you like and dislike about them; where possible try to compare and contrast them.

Now that you have an understanding of the existing texts (films and television shows) that you like, you need to start developing your own idea. Think about what genre (type) of film or television programme you would like to create

  • Write a short paragraph (200 words) outlining what genre of film and television show your idea is going to be and state why you have chosen this genre. 
Step Three - Idea Development Step Four - Justification
Once you have completed Step One and Step Two, this is where you start to develop your idea into a full story. Think about what is going to happen at the beginning, middle and end. Also, try to develop your characters and give some background information about them.
  • Write as much as you want explaining your idea, characters, and detail what happens at the beginning, middle and end.

Now you have completed the previous three stages you need to try and sell your idea in order to gain your unlimited budget from your executive producers (your interviewer)!

  • Write a short paragraph (250 words) justifying why you think your idea would work as a film or television show, and why people would want to watch it. 

UCSCS Level 3 Creative Media Production – Further Information

During your interview, the tutor will arrange a date for a second interview where the subject specific task will be reviewed. 

Please CreativeMedia2make sure that the task has been completed by this date, as failure to do so will impact upon course offers. Please also make sure that the tutor can easily access the work during this interview, either online or alternative storage media (e.g. USB).

Below, you can find some tips for approaching the task: -

  • Research genres (types) of films and television shows as this will help you to understand what conventions or characters to include in your idea. A useful site: http://www.filmsite.org/filmgenres.html
  • Think simple! The best thing that you can do is to keep your idea straightforward and make sure that you’re not trying to fit too much into a short space of time.
  • Remember that you are not just creating a film or television show that you want to watch, but also one that an audience would like to watch as well. This will help when it comes to selling your idea (step four).

If you have any questions about the task, please feel free to email one of the tutors on the Level 3 Creative Media Production course:
 

David Lashbrook (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
George Baldwin (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Tamara Lesniewska (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)